Osteoporosis

Our bones are living tissue that give our body structure, allow us to move and protect our organs. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin and  lose their strength. This can lead to fractures, which cause pain and make everyday activities extremely difficult. After a hip fracture, about one-quarter of people die or never walk again. 

It’s estimated over 200 million women have osteoporosis. That’s more than the combined populations of the Germany, the United Kingdom and France.

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty will experience an osteoporotic fracture.

In fact, every three seconds a bone will break, somewhere in the world, because of this disease.

Many people won’t know they have osteoporosis until their first fracture, which is why it’s called the ‘silent disease’. Even after a break, it often goes untreated.

The good news is osteoporosis can be diagnosed and treated and fractures often prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and appropriate medication for those in need.
 

Our Bone Health Advocates

Julie Payette is chief astronaut for the Canadian Space Agency

Worldwide, one out of three women and one out of five men over the age of 50 suffers from osteoporosis. But the good news is that osteoporosis is preventable by eating right, by moving and exercising, and by knowing about it. If you would like to find out more about osteoporosis, visit the International Osteoporosis Foundation's website and take the risk test.

Ilie Nastase, tennis champion

It is very important that we are moving, continually moving. It doesn’t matter what we do; exercise, or playing tennis or soccer. We have to move and it is also good for the muscles, not only for the bones. If you want to prevent osteoporosis do like me: have babies when you are over 60 so they can run you all over the place.

Gro Harlem Brundtland, former director general, World Health Organization, in an exclusive interview given to IOF, January 1999

Twenty-five years ago, the world's leading experts in cardiovascular diseases warned of an impending epidemic of heart disease in developing countries. This warning was largely ignored and we are now seeing a dramatic increase in prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in the developing world. We must not allow the same thing to happen for osteoporosis. We must act now.